Our Story

The scary off-route class 4 climb on Clements Mountain

Climb Glacier National Park is an illustrated guidebook for off-trail travel in Glacier National Park.

We are passionate about climbing in Glacier and every peak featured in our books have been climbed by the author so we can give the most accurate description of the climbs.

This is our story.

Climb Glacier National Park is the result of getting off-route in Glacier National Park.  After a few years of climbing and using the written route from the existing guidebook to reach summits we identified a need come out with a book that had updated routes for the popular climbs in Glacier.

This all happened in 2003 while climbing Clements Mountain near Logan Pass.  Two climbing partners got off route and got into some class IV terrain that was totally unnecessary and potentially dangerous.  We got lucky and found the goat trail on the Bird Woman Valley side of Clements Mountain.

After completing that route we agreed that a photo with the route drawn on it would make it easier to find the safest routes to the summit.  For a few years we passed these photos around to our friends and they really helped.

While hiking one of Outside Magazine’s 10 most dangerous hikes in the United States, the Huckleberry Lookout Trail, Blake shared the idea about an actual guidebook with red-lines with his friend  John VanArendonk.  John said to go for it and agreed to help research routes as well as contribute to the process.

Volume 1: Logan Pass, The Garden Wall, and Siyeh Bend.

Pollock Mountain from near Piegan Mountain

Pollock Mountain from near Piegan Mountain

In 2010, we summited 32 peaks along Going-to-the-Sun Road and climbed around 100,000 vertical feet to gather the data for Volume 1 of the guidebook series.  Numerous revisions lead to a book that was released in 2011 and quickly became a hit with climbers and off-trail explorers.

This volume received accolades from many readers due to its unique presentation such as using over 300 color photos to help readers reach the summits.  Readers also liked the Summit Views with peaks identified.

Volume 1 has routes up 16 peaks including iconic peaks such as Mount Siyeh, Going-to-the-Sun Mountain, Reynolds Mountain, and Pollock Mountain.  Volume 1 was reprinted in the spring of 2012.

Volume 2: The Two Medicine Valley and Firebrand Pass

Off-trail route on Mount Rockwell.

Off-trail route on Mount Rockwell.

With a great response for Volume 1 we started working on Volume 2 in 2011.  Routes for the peaks in Two Medicine and Firebrand Pass area were completed and Volume 2 was released in 2012.

This volume features 22 peaks including Rising Wolf Mountain and Sinopah Mountain which should be on every peak baggers lists as must-climbs.  We added UTM points and conditioning tips from Dr. Brad Roy.

A classic traverse from Firebrand Pass to the Two Medicine Valley is included in this volume.  This epic off-trail adventure travels about 15 miles along the Continental Divide and does not require any scrambling.

Volume 3: The Northern Highline, Lake McDonald, and Sperry Glacier Basin

Mount Wilbur from the false summit of Mount Grinnell

Mount Wilbur from the false summit of Mount Grinnell

Volume 3 was  “researched” and written in 2012.  This volume features 17 peaks and featured routes to three of Glacier’s classic peaks, Iceberg Peak, Heavens Peak and Edwards Mountain.

This is a beautiful area to spend some time exploring.  Summiting peaks in this volume requires a bit more stamina due to the greater distances and increases in elevation gains, but it is definitely worth it.  It is more challenging to start in the McDonald Creek drainage and summit peaks that are over 9,000 feet in height.

Volume 4: The Many Glacier Valley

Climber ascending Mount Grinnell

Climber ascending Mount Grinnell

We spent the summer of 2014 in Many Glacier and loved every minute of it.

This “researching” was not without challenges. Most of the team lives in the Flathead Valley and reaching Many Glacier requires a 300 mile round trip just to reach the trailheads. To solve that problem we parked a camper at Duck Lake and used that as a home base.

Forest fires and summer storms also proved to be quite a challenge and for the first time ever we canceled the climbs to Seward Mountain and Cracker Peak and deleted them from the guidebook.

In the end Volume 4 only features 11 summits but they are all classic Glacier National Park climbs. The short approaches and views are sure to get anyone excited about traveling off-trail in the Many Glacier Valley.

Volume 5: St. Mary Valley, Cutbank Valley and Marias Pass

_MG_0079

Some of the crew on the route to Triple Divide Peak.

Some of the crew on the route to Triple Divide Peak.

We are currently working at completing this volume. It has taken way longer than we planned due to fires in the summer of 2015. This volume has a number of classic climbs and some that are not well known at all. The classic climbs include Mount Jackson, Little Chief Mountain and Triple Divide Peak. Lesser known summits such as Medicine Grizzly Peak, Skeleton Mountain and Kupunkamint Mountain will certainly demand some of your attention as well.

Look for this volume on our webstore in the spring of 2017.

The Future – Volume 6

Climbers on Summit Mountain

Climbers on Summit Mountain

We have one more volume planned for this series it is titled The Best Day Climbs of Glacier National Park.

What are your favorite day climbs?

There will be nearly 100 peaks featured in this guidebook series. Send Blake a message in the Contact Us section and let him know what you like the best.

 

We have some plans about where we will go and what we will do after completing this series but you will have to wait for that.

2 thoughts on “Our Story

  1. Farzin

    I love your first 3 volumes. Are you planning to add a volume on the more technical routes? It would great to include climbs like St. Nic.

    Reply
    1. Blake Post author

      Farzin

      Right now there are no plans to do technical routes for Glacier. Believe it or not this has been a long project and I am getting worn out but also loving every minute of it. I think the technical climbs such as Wilbur, Split, and St. Nicholas need to be left for mountaineers who have the experience and skills to route find and place solid protection.

      I am not sure how much I could add to the current knowledge base that is out there for these routes and certainly do not want to get so technical that I show where every move is located. That is what I want to protect in this project is encouraging people to get out there and figure it out with guidance from a great guidebook.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *